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  Jesús Abad Colorado
Adál
Ana Adarve
Keith Aguiar
Raúl Aguilar
Pilar Agüero-Esparza
Herminia Albarrán
 Lalo Alcaraz
Juana Alicia
Carlos Almaraz
Laura Amin
María Elena Anaya
Natalia Anciso
 Erick Andino
Ricardo Anguia
Los Anthropolocos
Elia Arce
Michael Arcega
Graciela Arguelles
 Adrian Arias
Alfredo Arreguin
ASCO
David Avalos
Mitsy Avila Ovalles
Juan Luna Avin
  
  Participated in the Following Exhibitions MARIA: Politics. Sex. Death. Men. <2008>
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ARTIST INFORMATIONBIO  

Keith Aguiar

Keith Aguiar relocated to San Francisco 3 years ago from Providence, RI and has been documenting his arrival since. Keith has had several group shows in his recent past, including a one evening exclusive showing at 111 Minna Gallery last month. Other exhibitions include work for “PHotoREALness” at the Grey Area Gallery in April of 2007 and a solo exhibition entitled “Untamed Vessels” at the Red Square Gallery of Treasure Island Media in September of 2006. Aside from gallery shows and various impromptu slideshows throughout the city’s queer club venues, he has been featured in an article on up-and-coming queer artists of the bay in the San Francisco Guardian entitled “Flaming Creators” in June of 2007. And if all this isn’t enough, he has been slaving away under the gentle guise of Brother Bramm, to develop an artist publication with fellow photographer Jody Jock entitled “Prayers for Children” guaranteed to overload your unsatisfied senses.

Although Keith is mostly known for his documentary photography, his work includes a plethora of subjects ranging from minimalist textures to explicit sex scenes. His work invites you into a world of rich color, texture, and chaos to find an underlying reality that we all often take for granted: freedom. He asks you to explore the intricate beauty that comes from reconnecting with more primitive forms of expression. His documentary work brings you into a very forgotten niche of queer individuals who continue to resist assimilation. Individuals who strive to live freely and express themselves fully through art, dress, and song without compromise to both hetero and homo normative values that have imprisoned so many of his generation. His photos explore preconceived notions of beauty, call taste into question, and at times even disturb. In the end, his work will leave you curious, if not craving for more.