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Current Exhibition

Studio 24 Presents: "In Homage To Rupert Garcia"

Wednesday, March 26, 2014 - Sunday, May 4, 2014

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In recognition of Rupert Garcia’s Lifetime Achievement Award from the Southern Graphics Council International, Galería de la Raza is pleased to present In Homage To Rupert Garcia.

The exhibition will feature prints by the artist taken from Galería’s own permanent collection and the collection of fellow print makers, reflecting Garcia’s impact on not only Galería as an institution but his marked influence on other artists and the medium itself.

As an institution dedicated to fostering awareness and appreciation of Latino / Chicano art and culture, Galería is honored to celebrate such a renowned artist whose work embodies the intersection of art and activism, creating some of the most iconic and compellingimages of the social and political issues of our time.

 

About the artist

Born in French Camp, California, Rupert García is a leading Chicano artist whose work is known as much for its political power as for its strong, evocative graphics and rich colors. Between 1967 and 1975 he became recognized for his political posters, which dealt with race, politics, and the Vietnam War. During that period, García also participated in the formation of several seminal West Coast civil rights movement-oriented workshops and collectives such as the San Francisco Poster Workshop and Galería de la Raza.

García has received numerous awards and honors, including an individual artist fellowship grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. In 1992, he received the President’s Scholar Award from San Jose State University, the San Joaquin Delta College’s Distinguished Alumni Award, KGO-TV’s Profile of Excellence Award, and the College Art Association’s Distinguished Award for Lifetime Achievement. In 1995, he received the National Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences’ Lifetime Achievement Award in Art. García’s silkscreen posters, etchings, paintings, and pastel portraits have been featured in hundreds of exhibitions. The bulk of his work is in the permanent collection of the Smithsonian Institution, the UCSB Library’s California Ethnic and Multicultural Archives. He lives in Oakland, CA.

 

Curatorial Statement

Works by Rupert García

On loan from the private collections of Jesus Barraza, Juan Fuentes, Jos Sances & Galería de la Raza

 

Galería de la Raza is pleased to present In Homage to Rupert García as the fourth exhibition of our Studio 24 Presents series.  This exhibition is being presented in conjunction with the 42nd annual Southern Graphics Council International conference, which will be honoring García with a Lifetime Achievement award.

His legacy as a founding member of Galería de la Raza speaks to the role his work and scholarship have played in advancing the dialog of Chicano art and culture, and of his influence on a younger generation of Chicano artists. Taken from a 1977 interview conducted by fellow Galería founder, Ralph Maradiaga, García discusses how some of his most iconic works speak to a universal narrative:

“…There is always a relationship between any of my posters, whether they are about Attica or Deportation, Angela Davis or Kent State, the Indo-China war or Zapata, Lipton’s Tea or Lolita Lebrón.  All of these statements are politically interrelated, and because I view myself as a Chicano, I relate and identify with the Third World struggle and people’s struggles wherever they exist.  It is from this understanding of social relationships that I get my strength and support to continue making the kinds of pictures I do.

What is unique about this is not that I am able to make these connections, but the particular way in which I visually realize the relationship.  For me, the important question is how I visually express this social dynamic between me and the rest of the world.” [1]

The reception for In Homage To Rupert Garcia was in conjuction with the SCGI conference and Mission Art Walk on Saturday, March 29. More info here.

[1] García, Rupert. “Chicano poster art: interview with Rupert Garcia.” The Fifth Sun: Contemporary/Traditional Chicano and Latino Art. Ralph Maradiaga. Berkeley: University Art Museum of California, Berkeley, 1977: 30.

Free and open to the public

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Current Exhibition: "Paper and Blade: Storytelling under the Knife"

Works by Mayumi Hamanaka, Adrienne Heloise, Ian Kuali`i and Kai Margarida-Ramírez de Arellano

Saturday, April 12, 2014 - Saturday, May 31, 2014

Presented in partnership with Kua'aina Associates and the de Young Museum

 

View the final installation of new works by four diverse paper cut artists as their de Young Artist Fellows project comes to an end. 

Opening reception Saturday, April 12 at 7pm with DJ Brown Amy

Event on Facebook >>

 

Cut paper is the medium that brings these four artists together, and while each has developed personalized techniques to obtain unique styles and aesthetics, the fundamental materials are the same. Meditative in nature, the cutting of paper is a slow, deliberate, and often solitary practice that lends itself to a magical quality.  In order to create with cut paper, the artist must first destroy, an alchemical process, speaking to the divine dichotomy of creation and destruction.

The artists' individual practices entail the use of hidden meanings within images and symbols, which will be an interesting point of departure. They are fascinated by the ephemeral quality of paper and how it is much like the fleeting experience of human memories/stories and of life itself. The framework for this artistic collaboration will allow for the intersection of historical identities and create a model for transmutation of past episodes into their effects on the present and how we might approach or look at the future.

A team of four cut paper artists will engage in an artistic process inspired by cultural and historical phenomenon. Each artist comes from a different ethnic background; national origin and aesthetic style thus bring to the project diversity of beliefs and practices that is the dynamic foundation for this artistic convergence. The artists will engage in an installation experiment to explore their disparate cultural histories charting separate and intertwined chronologies through the context of universal and the sacred, and forging science and magic from multiple directions. Their individual practices entail the use of hidden meanings within images and symbols, which will be an interesting point of departure. The framework of this artistic collaboration will allow for the intersection of historical Identity and create a model for transmutation of past episodes and its affect on the present and how we might approach or look at the future. The artists are fascinated by the ephemeral quality of paper and how it is much like the fleeting experience of human memories/stories and of life itself. The cutting of paper is a slow, deliberate, and often a solitary practice that lends itself to a magical quality – an alchemical process, speaking to the divine dichotomy of destruction and creation.

 

About the artists

Mayumi Hamanaka uses historical photographs and references to examine memory and the mistakes of the past. She uses a subtle process of cutting topographies into photographs, where details start to disappear and amorphous white forms develop like oversize puzzle pieces. Up close they suggest topographical contour maps, but the contours are layers of paper cutouts secured by tiny metal studs. These layers speak to the layers of earth that consists of layers of formerly living things, including humans.

Adrienne Heloise researches historical events as the basis for her work and translates early European paintings into contemporary explorations of intimacy, gender and power.  She cuts colored paper, recycled security envelopes and vinyl to recreate images from the French Romantic era paintings. She delves into the isolation and titillation of homosocial interaction by appropriating the symbols of 19th century western royalty, weaponry and fashion.

Ian Kuali`i’s creative process is "The meditative process of destroying to create." Blending the contrasting elements of loose graffiti techniques with detailed hand cut paper to manifest unique compositions. His work is a balance between the rough and delicate while exploring ideas of modern progress dependent on a foundation in one’s own history. His art is influenced by his ancestral ties to the Southwest United States and Hawaii, as well as Masonic symbolism, mysticism, global politics and themes of urban decay.

Kai Margarida-Ramírez was born in Puerto Rico and raised in New Mexico. This double sense of home has given her a unique perspective on post-colonial, feminist and border identity. Specializing in paper cutting and embroidery, Kai's artwork fuses her family mythology, pop-culture, and intricate handiwork. Her most recent paper cuts source from family stories and photographs taken by her great-great-grandmother, thereby establishing inter-generational collaborations with her ancestors. This process has allowed Kai to collapse time and explore her space as a woman between cultures, languages, and epochs. Kai is based in Brooklyn, NY and is an MFA Fine Arts candidate at Parsons The New School for Design.

 

About DJ Brown Amy

Amy Martinez (aka DJ Brown Amy) is a DJ/musician who has been working in and around San Francisco for the last seven years. She is co-founder of monthly queer soul party Hard French, which has been voted Best Overall Queer Party for two consecutive years of its four year stint, and spins some of her favorite 45's the first Saturday of every month. A hairdresser by trade, she is also the percussive backbone of the powerful, all-women of color, psych-rock four-piece Queen Crescent. Both her DJ and performance practices have garnered international recognition and have allowed her the opportunities to tour the continental US, Canada and Mexico. When she's not in the studio or digging through record crates, Amy is busy making connections between alternative music forms and global social movements, texting her mom and making taco salads.

 

Learn more about the exhibition >>

Public program information to be announced soon

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Galería de la Raza: an Interdisciplinary Chicano/Latino Space for Art, Thought and Activism
2857 24th Street, San Francisco, CA 94110 click here for directions to galería